Introduction
Photo Album
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American Indian Rights
Children / Education
Civil Rights
Civil Rights / Fair Housing
Consumer Protection
Elderly / Aging
Environment / Conservation
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Foreign Relations
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Children and Education
Excerpts from Speeches       Proceedings and Debates       Hearings       Committee prints and reports
During the early 1970s, Senator Mondale spearheaded innovative and progressive approaches to child poverty. It was a time in which childhood development and family issues received little attention from the government or the press. It was also a time of social revolution as increasing numbers of women began to join the workforce. Senator Mondale was convinced of the need for a comprehensive strategy to improve the lives and futures of disadvantaged children and to strengthen the family. Key legislation authored by Mondale was vetoed by President Nixon, the result of backlash from social conservatives who opposed governmental interference in the family, combined with ambivalence towards the issue of working women and fear that the legislation was threatening the authority of the family.[1]Walter Mondale, "Poverty and Opportunity," in The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 91-109. Congress did not grapple with the issue of child poverty for another twenty years. "We lost a generation," wrote Mondale in The Good Fight, "and it breaks my heart."[2]Walter Mondale, The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 109.

As Chairman of the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, Senator Mondale presided over landmark hearings: Youth Crisis Services; Child Abuse Prevention; Sudden Infant Death Syndrome; American Families: Trends and Pressures; and Child and Family Services. In 1974 he observed that "before and since the Subcommittee was established, I have probably devoted more of my time in the Senate to the problems of children than to any other area. I have visited migrant labor camps, Indian reservations, urban slums, and depressed rural areas. I have learned that there are many subtle ways to mutilate the spirit of a child—by depriving him or her of adequate nutrition, or health care, or of a good education."[3]93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (June 4, 1974) at 17626.

Senator Mondale's first major legislation in the area of early childhood education was S. 1512, the Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971. The Act was built upon the success of Head Start, but extended services to children from families above the poverty level: "It is designed to assure that every child has a fair opportunity to reach his full potential."[4]92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (April 6, 1971) at 9869. Six days of hearings were held in which numerous witnesses attested to the benefits of Head Start and the need for more comprehensive and stimulating day care environments. At one point in the hearings, Senator Mondale expresses his frustration with the lack of financial support for early childhood programs: "Yesterday [May 25, 1971], if I understood correctly, we voted what probably amounts to at least a half billion dollars to pay poor children to go into combat and risk their lives. I voted against that because I thought it was blood money, and I think only poor kids can see that as an exciting alternative. Yet, here we are today 6 years after Headstart started, spending only $360 million for all of the preschool developmental systems for all of the children of this country."[5]Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., May 18 and 20, 1971. p. 637. Despite passing both the House and the Senate, Senator Mondale's bill was vetoed by President Nixon. In response, Senator Mondale called the President's veto, "a totally indefensible action" and "among the most irresponsible statements which I have encountered in 15 years of public life."[6]92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 10, 1971) at 46201.

"I was not about to give up on the issue—I just knew we had to be smarter about it."[7]Walter Mondale, The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 105. Mondale worked to deflect conservative attacks by changing the language of the bill—e.g. dropping comprehensive from the title, which critics had used to argue that the bill was proposing a "Big Brother" intrusion in the family, and using the word voluntary when talking about the bill to make it clear that it was intended to help families, not provide a government substitute for them. The new bill, entitled the Child and Family Services Act of 1972, passed the Senate in 1973. It passed the Senate again in 1975 as the Child and Family Services Act of 1974. However, the bill failed to pass the House both times. Senator Mondale speaks of this failure in his memoir The Good Fight:

We tried to ease . . . tensions for working mothers, while seeking to help the millions of young children who are denied the stimulation and emotional support all children need. We passed that legislation in the Senate three times, and it's an enduring frustration to me that it never became law. . . . My frustration is that we missed two decades of opportunity and lost a generation of children who grew up in poverty. I don't say my bill would have worked perfectly. . . But I believe we could have made a big difference in the way life starts for millions of kids, and I think we'd all have felt better about it. It would have given us a generation in which, for the first time, everyone had an equal chance in America.[8]Ibid., 108-109.

Senator Mondale was the key author of the "Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act of 1974," the first federal legislation to prevent child abuse. He worked tirelessly to bring awareness to issues from which many legislators, as well as the public, were inclined to look away: "It is time to reexamine our past efforts to prevent, identify and treat child abuse. It is time to figure out where we have gone wrong for once and for all to put an end to the tragic accounts that temporarily jolt us from our newspaper or television sets, before we file them away somewhere in the corner of our minds so we don't have to think about them."[9]Child Abuse Prevention Act, 1973: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth: To Establish a National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., March 26, 27, 31; April 24, 1973. p. 1.

Senator Mondale was also a strong proponent for secondary and higher education: "What will be the ultimate cost to the individual and to the society of the unrealized potential of millions of undereducated children and adults; of years of inequality of education, social, and economic opportunity; of neglected dropouts; of poorly prepared teachers; of alienated youth? Quality education is truly an investment and not an expense."[10]Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1970: Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. 91st Cong., 1st sess., December 1, 2 and 3, 1969. p. 123.

Throughout his Senate career, Senator Mondale introduced and supported legislation that provided financial assistance for eligible students. When introducing the Student Assistance Act of 1969, Senator Mondale argued that "because these 'working poor' live their lives in incessant struggle so quietly, they are sometimes called the 'forgotten Americans.' It is time that they be forgotten no longer. Many of these parents dream of sending their children to college. Some, through fantastic sacrifice, are able to do so. Most are not. It is time this Nation do something to help them realize their dreams."[11]91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (April 14, 1969) at 8778.

Excerpts from Senator Mondale's speeches on children and education: [Top]

"For too long, at the national level, we have resorted to rhetoric. We have authorized dreams, and then appropriated only peanuts....

I believe the choice before us now is a simple one. We can act to prevent incompetence and equalize opportunities by significantly increasing our investment in comprehensive early childhood programs, or we can postpone investing heavily in early childhood, and continue paying the high social and economic cost of poverty, human misery, and incompetence. I, for one, choose to meet our responsibilities rather than ignore them. I choose to give substance to the "new national commitment" President Nixon announced, by investing the necessary funds In that effort, and I offer the Headstart Child Development Act of 1969 as a means to that end."

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. Headstart Child Development Act: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty. Pt. 1 91st Cong., 1st sess., August 4, 5, and 6, 1969 at 16.


Walter Mondale speaks at the final meeting of a series of Senate hearings on children and youth, 1971; credit: Minnesota Historical Society

"What will be the ultimate cost to the individual and to the society of the unrealized potential of millions of undereducated children and adults; of years of inequality of education, social, and economic opportunity; of neglected dropouts; of poorly prepared teachers; of alienated youth?

Quality education is truly an investment and not an expense."

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1970: Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. 91st Cong., 1st sess., December 1, 2 and 3, 1969 at 123.


 

 

"We have an obligation to human beings, and particularly children, who are powerless to fight for themselves. It seems that we tend to forget that as we rush headlong into nonhuman spending on a massive scale for bombs, weaponry, highways, and the like. We must have as a real priority our children, including the children of the poor and disadvantaged." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (November 20, 1970) at 38319.



 

 

 

 

 

 

"Over the past nearly 6 years, I have probably served on as many human-problem committees and subcommittees as any of my colleagues. I have been all over this country—its ghettos, its Indian reservations, migrant labor camps, among the Eskimos and the Athabascans, and in the pockets of white poverty—and I am unable to express the profound frustration that I feel at knowing that we are such a powerful and wealthy society and at the same time seem to so tragically fail thousands and millions of our children. It is not only immoral. It is not only unnecessary. I think this failure tampers with the very existence and future of a vital democratic society."

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee Print. Justice for Children: Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity. June 1972 at 31.


"I cannot think of anything that is more disgraceful than living in this land of agricultural abundance, great wealth, and great power, and trying to save a few pennies on the school lunch program that is needed to provide nutritious meals for the schoolchildren of this country when we know beyond any doubt, based upon the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition, of which I am privileged to be a member, and based on the hearings held by the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, that millions of needy American children are being denied the nutritious lunch they need for their health and in terms of their ability to learn in school....

I cannot think of any area in which those savings are more reprehensible and less justifiable than in the area of attempting to save money at the expense of a child's health or to save money at the expense of a child's capacity to learn." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (October 1, 1971) at 34471.


"It is time to reexamine our past efforts to prevent, identify and treat child abuse. It is time to figure out where we have gone wrong for once and for all to put an end to the tragic accounts that temporarily jolt us from our newspaper or television sets, before we file them away somewhere in the corner of our minds so we don't have to think about them."

U.S. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. Child Abuse Prevention Act, 1973: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth: To Establish a National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., March 26, 27, 31 and April 24, 1973 at 1.

Senator Walter Mondale speaks during Child Care Bill Hearings held in Washington, D.C., 1975; credit: Minnesota Historical Society

"I think that this country must do a far better job than it's done, and spend more than it has and spend it more wisely and with more spirit and compassion, and with a fuller commitment than we ever have had, to give every child a chance, and I think that's so central that I am sickened by some who would abandon that effort."

Interview with Elizabeth Drew in "A Reporter at Large: Conversation with a Senator," The New Yorker, May 1973 at 125.

Albert Shanker, president of the United Federation of Teachers (UFT), presents Senator Walter Mondale with the UFT's John Dewey Award for outstanding service to education, 1973; credit: Minnesota Historical Society

Marian Wright Edelman, lifelong advocate for disadvantaged children and founder of the Children's Defense Fund, and Peter Edelman, Georgetown law professor, supported and inspired Senator Mondale's work in issues related to childhood development and poverty-stricken children.

 

 

 

 

 

"I do not know why it is that with all the competing demands for Federal money, we seem to assume education should be the lowest rated priority. Because if there is any hope for the delivery of equal opportunity in education, which ought to be at the heart of the basic American commitment, it seems to me, among other things, it demands higher priorities for education.

This is giving the children the best chance to achieve their own potential—to become good parents, to become good citizens, to pay their taxes, to stay off welfare, to avoid committing crimes; and then to produce their own families which, in the next generation, will do the same....

I do not know of a cheaper way of educating children. All our efforts to do it in a cheaper way have failed, and will fail. Education is expensive. If we want good teachers, we must pay them. If we want decent facilities, we must pay for them. When we deal with some children, whom I call children of a cheated background, who come to school with tremendous handicaps that they have accumulated through no fault of their own, it is frightfully expensive to give them a chance. Yet it is still the best investment we can make." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 20, 1974) at 15325.


"During my decade in the Senate, I have served on as many or more of what might be called human problem committees as any one of my colleagues.... For much of this time we have been dealing with problems that have often been directly related to pressures on families: housing problems, welfare problems, nutritional problems, the health problems, and all the rest.

The more I have focused on these problems, the more I am convinced of the absolute centrality and fundamental importance of healthy families in American life as the key, best, and superior way of raising children. There is really no substitute for a healthy family in developing a secure, physically sound, motivated child who has a sense of worth. And that is the base for a good citizen—a person who can be a participating and contributing member of society." 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 31, 1975) at 26549.


"You never know what a young person is going to do or what their potential is. You will never know if you don't give them a chance. This goal should be at the top of our list."

Interview with Peter Kizilos in "Citizen Mondale," Minnesota, March-April 1990 at 12.

Selected U.S. Senate proceedings and debates on children and education, 1967-1976: [Top]
    Early Childhood Education Vocational Education Child Advocacy
    K-12 Education Children's Health and Nutrition, including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome The American Family
    Higher Education Child Abuse Speeches & Publications Submitted


    Early Childhood Education
    • Consideration of appropriations for Departments of Labor, Health, Education, and Welfare. Senator Mondale speaks in support of an amendment by Senator Morse (D-OR) regarding increased funding for Teacher Corps; Senator Morse's amendment is rejected. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (August 2, 1967): 20997-21050. (Mondale at 21016)

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2060, the Head Start Child Development Act of 1969: "This measure ... would greatly strengthen and expand programs in early childhood development. It would offer preschool children from poverty areas needed health care, nutritional aid, educational assistance, and social services. It would attack the conditions of poverty that can cripple a child's intellect for life. It seeks, in short, to help impoverished children reach their full potential." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (May 5, 1969): 11294-11302.

    • Senator Mondale submits Amendment No. 152 to S. 1809 (introduced April 15 by Senator Nelson, D-WI), providing additional funding for Head Start: "While few would contend that we have found all the solutions to early childhood problems, these hearings clearly indicated that we know how to prevent a great deal of nutritional, health, and intellectual damage from occurring. They revealed that we know that by providing health care and nutritious diets to infants and young children, we can prevent and correct conditions that otherwise could damage and that by providing proper educational stimulation we can help disadvantaged children get a more equal start in school. They showed, in short, that we know a great deal about how to help poor children gain a better chance to reach their full potential." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (September 9, 1969): 24782-24783.

    • Senator Mondale opposes an amendment that would cut back on Head Start. The amendment is rejected. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (October 14, 1969): 29913-29916. (Mondale at 29914)

    • Senator Kennedy (D-MA) submits Senator Mondale's testimony to the Committee on National Priorities of the Democratic Council. Mondale expresses concern about a "set of national priorities that places hardware above humans" and calls for a shift of resources from "military gadgetry to high priority investments in human beings." He states that "our unwillingness to provide help to deprived children is perhaps our most tragic and costly mistake." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (February 26, 1970): 5028-5029.

    • Senator Mondale argues for increased spending for Head Start: "We have an obligation to human beings, and particularly children, who are powerless to fight for themselves. It seems that we tend to forget that as we rush headlong into nonhuman spending on a massive scale for bombs, weaponry, highways, and the like. We must have as a real priority our children, including the children of the poor and disadvantaged." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (November 20, 1970): 38299-38327. (Mondale at 38319)

    • Senator Harris (D-OK) submits an amendment on behalf of himself and Senators Javits (R-NY), Mondale, and Bayh (D-IN) that strikes a section of H.R. 17550 (introduced in May by Representatives Mills, D-AR, and Byrnes,R-WI) creating a Federal Child Care Corporation; Senator Mondale states, "to do the wrong thing to children may be worse than to do nothing." The amendment is agreed to. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (December 29, 1970): 43837-43854. (Mondale at 43840)

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 1512, The Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971, providing a full range of health, education, nutrition, and social services for American children. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (April 6, 1971): 9869-9881.

    • Senator Mondale submits Senator Bayh's (D-IN) testimony at the joint hearings of the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (June 4, 1971): 18156-18157.

    • Debate on S. 2007 (introduced June 4 by Senator Nelson, D-WI), providing for the continuation of programs authorized under the "Economic Opportunity Act of 1964." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 8, 1971): 30968-30999.

    • Further consideration of S. 2007. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 8, 1971): 31010-31017.

    • Senator Mondale adds several cosponsors to S. 1512: "This makes a total of 33 sponsors and cosponsors of the bill which Senator Javits, Senator Nelson, Senator Schweiker, and I introduced on April 5, 1971, and whose major provisions have been adopted in section 6 of S. 2007, the pending bill which extends the Economic Opportunity Act." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 8, 1971): 30922.

    • Continued debate on S. 2007. The bill is amended and passed. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 9, 1971): 31224-31263.

    • Senator Nelson (D-WI) submits the conference report for S. 2007. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (November 30, 1971): 43498-43505.

    • Senator Mondale expresses support for the Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1971, S. 2007, conference report: "I am delighted to support its provisions strengthening and improving OEO [Office of Economic Opportunity] programs—including neighborhood health centers, emergency food and medical services, community action programs, alcoholic and drug treatment, family planning, older workers programs, migrant assistance, neighborhood youth corps and community economic development. I am particularly proud that this report incorporates the basic provisions of two bills I had the privilege to sponsor, with bipartisan support—S. 1512, the Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971, and S. 1305, the National Legal Services Corporation Act." The conference report is agreed to. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 2, 1971): 44113-44158. (Mondale at 44120 and 44142)

    • Senator Mondale addresses concerns expressed during the debate on the S. 2007 conference report and clarifies misleading statements made during the debate. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 6, 1971): 44838-44839.

    • Debate on President Nixon's veto of S. 2007. Senator Mondale argues: "We all know there are hundreds, thousands, and millions of children who never have a chance, who are mangled and destroyed the first 5 years of life. This bill is the best that the House and Senate could think of to undo the monstrous and immoral wrong that we now visit upon the lives of those tragic children." The Senate fails to override the veto. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 10, 1971): 46198-46222. (Mondale at 46201)

    • President Nixon's veto of S. 2007. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 10, 1971): 46057-46059.

    • Senators Nelson (D-WI) and Mondale introduce S. 3193, the Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1972, establishing a comprehensive child care program. The legislation is a revision of S. 1512 (which was incorporated into S. 2007 in the previous session and vetoed by President Nixon). The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 17, 1972): 4412-4441.

    • Senator Mondale introduces two of the five amendments he sponsors or cosponsors to H.R. 1 (introduced in the House in January 1971 by Representatives Mills, D-AR, and Byrnes, R-WI); the amendments are designed to assure that day care provided under the bill "will meet at least minimal standards of quality, focus on the needs of the children served, and be offered under terms which will strengthen family life." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (April 20, 1972): 13740-13745.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3617, the Comprehensive Head Start, Child Development, and Family Services Act of 1972, a modified version of S. 2007 adopted in 1971 by Congress but vetoed by President Nixon: "The bill we are considering today seeks to better meet the need for quality, family-oriented preschool programs among millions of young children whose mothers are working or who because of poverty are denied adequate health care, nutrition or educational opportunity." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (June 19, 1972): 21374-21399.

    • Continued debate on S. 3617, the Comprehensive Head Start, Child Development, and Family Services Act of 1972; Senator Mondale argues for local control of the program funds: "We think the experience of Head Start has shown that local parentally controlled programs are, without any doubt, the best. They are the closest to the people concerned. They guarantee that the children will be most sensitively handled. They are programs which build upon and strengthen the family, and which build upon the strength of the community itself." The bill is passed and referred to the Committee on Education and Labor (June 21). 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (June 20, 1972): 21557-21627.

    • Continued debate on H.R. 1, to amend the Social Security Act; Senator Mondale opposes an amendment sponsored by Senator Roth (D-DE), calling the child care portion of the amendment "poorly conceived" and "perhaps the worst proposal dealing with children that I have ever seen" due to inadequate adult-child ratios as well as lack of parent participation and local control over programs; he cosponsors an amendment with Senator Percy (R-IL). 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (October 4, 1972): 33667-33684. (Mondale at 33669)

    • Senator Mondale introduces another amendment to H.R. 1, retaining the $800 million in the bill for child care, but making the funds available through the existing program which focuses on state control rather than creating a new federal Bureau of Child Care, as proposed in the Roth amendment. Senator Mondale's amendment is agreed to. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (October 5, 1972): 33961-33972.

    • Consideration of the conference report for H.R. 1. Senator Mondale reluctantly votes in favor. (See Elderly/Aging section for reason.) The conference report is agreed to. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (October 17, 1972): 36804-36825.

    • H.R. 1 is approved by the President and becomes Public Law 92-603. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (October 18, 1972).

    • Senator McIntyre (D-NH) commends Senator Mondale "for his rejection of the crisis mentality and his determination to look beneath symptoms to underlying causes. For Senator Mondale is piercing through the need for a restoration of an American sense of community to reach and examine an even more elemental need—a restoration of the American sense of family." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (October 1, 1973): 32203-32204.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2700, postponing the Head Start fee schedule. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (November 14, 1973): 37032.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment No. 724 to H.R. 3153 (passed in House on April 2 and reported November 26 from the Committee on Finance), amending the Social Security Act; his amendment seeks to restore the present standards for federally assisted day care: "In my opinion, this amendment is very important for the protection of our children. It is designed to assure that children receiving federally assisted day care service will continue to be protected against dangerous, unsanitary, insensitive, and unhealthy programs.... I regard this as an essential, indispensable measure to assure justice for all children of our country." House and Senate could not agree to amendments. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (November 28, 1973): 38350-38402. (Mondale at 38384)

    • Senator Mondale submits changes to Amendment No. 724. The amendment is agreed to. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (November 29, 1973): 38629-38631.

    • Senate consideration of H.R. 11441 (passed by the House on December 3), postponing the implementation of a fee schedule for "nonpoor children" participating in Head Start programs. The bill is identical to S. 2700, introduced by Mondale November 14, 1973. It passes the Senate and becomes Public Law 93-202. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (December 18, 1973): 42096-42098.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3754, the Child and Family Services Act of 1974: "Our bill is designed to provide financial assistance to help States and localities upgrade the quality and expand their services for children and families. This measure incorporates the fundamental principles and elements contained in both the child development provisions in S. 2007, the Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1971, which passed the Congress in 1971, and was vetoed by President Nixon, and in the Comprehensive Head Start, Child Development and Family Services Act of 1972, which passed the Senate by a vote of 73 to 12 on June 20, 1972." The bill is referred to Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 11, 1974): 22765-22776.

    • Senator Mondale submits a section-by-section analysis of S. 3754, the Child and Family Services Act of 1974. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 18, 1974): 23968-23970.

    • Senator Mondale continues to argue that the need for adequate child care has increased dramatically. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (August 22, 1974): 29849-29854.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 626, the Child and Family Services Act of 1975, providing services for children and their families. The bill is identical to S. 3754, which Senators Mondale and Javits (R-NY) introduced in 1974. It "incorporates the fundamental principles and elements in the child development provisions in S. 2007" which was passed by Congress and vetoed by President Nixon. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (February 7, 1975): 2778-2793.

    • Senator Mondale announces the upcoming hearings on S. 626, the Child and Family Services Act of 1975 and submits a section-by-section analysis of the act. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (February 19, 1975): 3441-3443.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Marian Wright Edelman, Gov. Jerry Apodaca, Carmen Maymi, Dr. Rowland Mindlin, and Dorothy Lasday at the February 20 hearings on child and family services: "Their testimony provided an eloquent and compelling case for the need of this kind of legislation." 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (February 22, 1975): 3995-4003.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Joseph Reid, Jeanne Ellis, Congressman Andrew Jacobs, Jr., Fred Weintraub, Hal Benson, Paul Marchand, Richard Dowling, Dr. Samuel Ornstein, Judith Helms, Dr. Frederick Green, and John Sharon at the February 21 hearings on child and family services. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (March 5, 1975): 5354-5363.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Audrey Colom, Mary Grace Plaskett, Carol Burris, Arvonne Fraser, Sandy Hill, Edwina Hertzberg, Ann Ellwood, Tutti Sherlock, Dr. Susan Gray, Dr. James Gallagher, and Erline Kendall at the March 12 hearings on child and family services. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (March 18, 1975): 7170-7182.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Dr. Donald Newman, August W. Steinhilber, James A. Harris, Albert Shanker, and Ray Peterson at the June 5 hearings on child and family services. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 5, 1975): 17331-17339.

    • Senator Mondale submits a list of witnesses testifying at the final joint hearings on the Child and Family Services Acts, S. 626 and H.R. 2966 (introduced in the House in February by Representative Brademas, D-IN). 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 11, 1975): 18301-18302.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Congresswoman Bella Abzug, Frieda Mitchell, Hannah Atkins, Carlyle Cox, James Kagen, John Himelrick, and David Flagherty at the June 18 hearings on child and family services. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 18, 1975): 19458-19470.

    • Senator Mondale submits statements given by Rep. Parren Mitchell, Rep. Gunn McKay, Dr. Rhoda L. Lorand, Dr. Earl S. Schaefer, Dr. Bettye Caldwell, and Dr. Urie Bronfenbrenner at the June 20 hearings on child and family services. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 20, 1975): 20039-20050.

    • Senator Mondale states that, "once again efforts are being made to water down or delay implementation of the day care standards that provide minimal levels of protection for children in federally assisted child care programs. Legislation has been introduced which for some age levels would permit twice as many children per adult as present standards permit in child care centers.... this is not just some academic matter. These standards concern the health and well-being of thousands of young children in federally assisted child care programs. To weaken them further, or to delay their implementation or their enforcement, would be a tragedy;" Senator Mondale submits a letter he and Senators Ribicoff (D-CT) and Buckley (C/R-NY) sent to the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare urging him to implement the established day care standards immediately. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (September 23, 1975): 29760.

    • Senators Long (D-LA) and Mondale introduce S. 2425, a bill designed to provide the funding necessary to assure that child care programs meet current standards. The bill is referred to the Committee on Finance. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (September 29, 1975): 30661-30664. (Mondale at 30664)

    • Senator Mondale speaks in favor of S. 2425, urging his colleagues to not delay indefinitely the enforcement of day care standards, but instead to support his and Senator Long's (D-LA) bill that will make it possible for day cares to be in compliance. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (October 20, 1975): 33165-33166.

    • Senator Mondale vehemently defends S. 626, the Child and Family Services Act of 1975, against allegations that are "absolutely and completely false:" "A vicious and totally inaccurate propaganda campaign is currently being waged against the child and family services legislation pending before Congress. This bill ... is being subjected to one of the most distorted and dishonest attacks I have witnessed in my 15 years of public service. Wild and completely false allegations are being made that this legislation would somehow give children the legal right to disobey their parents; somehow prohibit parents from providing religious training to their children; somehow give the Government authority over child rearing; and somehow give children the right to complain about their parents and teachers 'without fear of reprisal.'" Senator Mondale provides material rebutting each of the allegations made in a widely circulated, unsigned flyer. He provides a summary of the Child and Family Services Act, and a section-by-section analysis of the legislation. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (November 19, 1975): 37380-37384.

    • Senator Mondale states, "as many of my colleagues are aware, the Child and Family Services Act [S. 626] is being subjected to an outrageous and totally dishonest propaganda attack. As I pointed out in my speech in the Senate on November 19, 1975, wild and completely false allegations are being made that this legislation would somehow give children the legal right to disobey their parents; somehow prohibit parents from providing religious training to their children; somehow give the Government authority over child rearing; and somehow give children the right to complain about their parents and teachers 'without fear of reprisal.' These allegations are absolutely and completely false. There is not a shred of truth in anyone of them. If there were, neither I nor any Member of Congress would be sponsoring this legislation;" he submits an "inter-religious statement" in support of the Child and Family Services Act, refuting the false allegations against the act. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (December 12, 1975): 40373.

    • Senator Mondale gives a brief legislative history on the child care provisions in H.R. 9803 (brought up for consideration in the Senate on January 29), a bill postponing by six months the effective date of the requirement that child day care centers meet specified staffing requirement; he argues for the necessity of upholding the federal interagency day care requirements (FIDCR). 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (January 26, 1976): 961-966.

    • Further consideration of H.R. 9803; Senator Mondale argues for upholding the federal interagency day care requirements (FIDCR) and for providing funds to help day cares meet the standards: "Why is it that we insist upon minimum day care standards? Is there a substantial reason why the federal government should be concerned about what happens to children when they are away from their parents and in day care? I think there is. Practically every professional in the field thinks there is." The bill is passed. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (January 29, 1976): 1513-1568. (Mondale at 1522)

    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment Nos. 1388 and 1389 to S. 626, the Child and Family Services Act (introduced by Senator Mondale February 7, 1975); both amendments are offered in reaction to "totally dishonest propaganda" against the act. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (February 5, 1976): 2518-2519.

    • The Senate considers the conference report on H.R. 9803; Senator Mondale speaks in support of the report. The conference report is agreed to. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (March 24, 1976): 7909-7913. (Mondale at 7912)

    • President Ford's veto of H.R. 9803. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (April 6, 1976): 9559-9560.

    • The Senate considers President Ford's veto message on the Child Day Care Standards Act, H.R. 9803; Senator Mondale urges his colleagues to override the veto: "The record will show that I have long believed in a strong state role in the administration of social services.... But at the same time, I have been impressed with the special responsibility we in the federal government must bear when we undertake to provide care for children, and especially young children, outside their homes. And that is why I have supported, and must continue to support, federal minimum standards for federally financed day care.... This bill does not require states to change their own day care standards. It says only that where federal funds are used to provide care for children outside their homes, then the federal government has some responsibility to see that the care they receive meets minimum standards." The Senate fails to override the veto. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (May 5, 1976): 12679-12687. (Mondale at 12685)


    Vocational Education
    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3205, a bill to strengthen the work study program in the Vocational Education Act of 1963. His bill would: increase the amount of money available to State and local authorities for administering the program; remove present limits on the amount a student may earn in a month or a school year; provide a modest increase in the amount of work study funds available for administration at the State and local level. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 89th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 112 (April 7, 1966): 7952-7955.

    • Senator Mondale calls attention to a "unique and highly successful program" that provides job training for disadvantaged young women. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (August 21, 1970): 29709-29710.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2603, amending the Vocational Education Act of 1963 "to assure equal educational opportunities in vocational education programs for individuals of both sexes:" "The aim of the legislation I am introducing today is to advance the full participation of both sexes in vocational education in a variety of areas including administration--both at the national and state levels--counseling, curriculum development and materials, as well as research and training, to mention only a few." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (November 3, 1975): 34668-34670.


    Child Advocacy
    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 1638 and S. 1639, providing benefits to children of disabled or deceased parents up to their 26th birthday if they are still in school. S. 1638 is referred to the Committee on Finance and S. 1639 is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (March 24, 1969): 7193-7196.

    • Senator Mondale introduces on behalf of Senators Cranston (D-CA), Murphy (R-CA), Yarborough (D-TX), Tower (R-TX), and Kennedy (D-MA) an amendment to S. 2548,a bill to amend the National School Lunch Act and the Child Nutrition Act of 1966, (reported from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry), providing increased funds for supplemental services centers, guidance counseling, bilingual education, and grants to local education agencies. The amendment is rejected. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (June 25, 1970): 21485-21492.

    • Senator Mondale expresses his hopes for the 'White House Conference on Children': "I hope the delegates will... focus on the question of how to insure that immediate implementation of the Conference's recommendations will follow. Certainly the past history of White House Conferences and President's Commissions is that they make strong, sweeping, perceptive reports which ultimately do nothing but gather dust....although we like to think of ourselves as a child-oriented society, I do not believe that there are many industrial nations which permit as many of our children to be mangled and destroyed by hunger and neglect and poor housing and poor education as we in the United states do." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (December 9, 1970): 40505-40519.

    • Congressman John Rarick (D-LA) issues a scathing statement against Senator Mondale and the "leftwing assault on our society which has taken over the White House Conference on Children." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (December 11, 1970): 41268-41269.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 1568 and S. 1569, providing benefits to children of disabled or deceased parents up to their 26th birthday if they are still in school. S. 1568 is referred to the Committee on Finance and S. 1569 is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (April 19, 1971): 10678-10679.

    • Senator Mondale expresses support for Senator Ribicoff's (D-CT) National Child Advocacy Act: "The concept of a child advocacy system to help assure that families and children receive the services or treatment they need, and to help assess community needs for children's services makes a good deal of sense. We should test this concept, find out how it works in actual practice, discover its strengths and weaknesses. This is precisely what Senator Ribicoff's bill would provide—by establishing Neighborhood Offices of Child Advocacy in up to 20 communities throughout the Nation—and precisely the reason I support this proposal." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (June 4, 1971): 18120-18125. (Mondale at 18124)

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3909, the Youth Programs Act of 1972, providing small grants for the operation of youth services such as runaway hotlines and houses, and for programs to address the issue of alienation of young people from government, the political process, and society as a whole. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (August 11, 1972): 27899-27912.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 949, a re-introduction of S. 2909, the Youth Programs Act from 1972; the bill provides small grants for youth crisis services. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (February 21, 1973): 4816-4817.

    • Senator Mondale is critical of the administration's decision not to fund the Neighborhood Youth Corps program in New York City: "I feel this decision would seriously aggravate the desperate shortage of work opportunities for young people. Ultimately, I believe it would be extremely wasteful in terms of America's greatest resource, the ability and potential of our youth." He urges Congress to fund the New York City program. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (June 4, 1973): 17923.

    • Senator Mondale calls attention to the "Week of the Young Child" and its attempt to "focus public attention and awareness on the rights and needs of the young." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (April 9, 1974): 10303-10304.

    • Senator Mondale discusses his amendment to restore $20 million to the "Follow Through" program which "has proven itself a valuable asset for improving, through education, the life chances of low income children;" Senator Mondale expresses appreciation for the Appropriations Committee's decision to include his amendment in the supplemental appropriations bill. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 1, 1974): 12667-12668.

    • Senator Mondale argues in favor of section 409 in S. 1539, supporting a wide range of initiatives designed to eliminate sex discrimination in education (reported in March from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare): "I am extremely distressed at the inexcusable delay of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in issuing guidelines and therefore providing for enforcement of Title IX. A year and a half after the enactment of Title IX, all HEW has to show us is the latest draft of the proposed regulations. I fully appreciate the complexities and the controversy involved in this matter. Yet with every day's delay we are telling another group of women that they have no recourse against the sex discrimination which stands between them and their right to develop as individuals to their fullest educational potential." The measure is indefinitely postponed and provisions are inserted in H.R. 69, which is passed in lieu of S. 1539 and becomes Public Law 93-380. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 20, 1974): 15278-15293. (Mondale at 15291)

    • Senator Mondale introduces an amendment to S. 1539, providing "special incentive grants to states which make high efforts in support of education." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 20, 1974): 15309-15333. (Mondale at 15325)

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3639, the Children and Youth Camp Safety Act of 1974; "As chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Children and Youth, I have been troubled by reports of inadequate safety and health standards in some of the camps to which we entrust our children. No reliable, comprehensive statistics are available on the extent of accidents and illnesses incurred by youngsters while they are attending camp. But the most recent figures show that in the summer of 1973, 25 children died; 1,448 were injured, and 1,223 suffered serious illnesses while at camp....we can no longer delay definitive congressional action on this problem." The bill is placed on the Senate calendar under Subjects on the Table. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (June 13, 1974): 19122-19128.

    • Senator Mondale expresses gratitude that the supplemental appropriations was passed and signed into law, appropriating $12 million for the Follow Through program; he is distressed, however, that the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare plans to designate a considerable portion of the appropriation for research activities connected with Follow Through rather than targeting it for direct classroom support. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (June 24, 1974): 20771-20772.

    • Senator Mondale's bill S. 3639, the Children and Youth Camp Safety Act of 1974, is reported from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (November 18, 1974): 36160.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 422, providing for the development of programs for youth camp safety: "Parents have a right to expect that their children are being cared for and supervised according to reasonable standards of health and safety. They have a right to know exactly what conditions they are sending their children into, and they have a right to know which camps provide the safest experience." The bill is placed on the Senate calendar under Subjects on the Table. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (January 27, 1975): 1347-1349.

    • Senator Mondale announces hearings to be held by the Subcommittee on Children and Youth concerning adoption and foster care. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121(March 5, 1975): 5363.

    • Senators Mondale and Javits (R-NY) introduce Amendment No. 577 to S. 2145, the Indochina Refugee Children Assistance Act of 1975 (introduced July 21 by Sen. Cranston, D-CA); the amendment authorizes funds for adult education services to Vietnamese and Cambodian refugees. The bill is reported from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare in October and passes the Senate. It becomes Public Law 94-405 in September 1976. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (September 1, 1975): 28622.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2604, the Adoption Information Exchange Act of 1975, creating a national adoption information exchange. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (November 3, 1975): 34670.


    K-12 Education
    • Senator Mondale states his support of H.R. 2362, the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 (referred from the House on March 29): "The measure of this Nation's future lies in the steps we take to prepare our youth to assume their responsibilities as the custodians of that future. While this legislation is designed primarily to elevate the educational level of the disadvantaged—of the children of poverty, it will provide a major 'shot in the arm' for our total educational system." The bill passes the Senate on April 9 and becomes Public Law 89-10 on April 11. 89th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 111 (April 8, 1965): 7550-7589. (Mondale at 7571)

    • Senator Mondale opposes a proposed 80% cut to a program providing milk to school children: "The relationship between hunger and nutrition, and the academic performance of children in school is very clear. Children who have not had an adequate, well-balanced diet, do much less well than others who have." 89th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 112 (February 8, 1966): 2525-2527.

    • Senator Mondale speaks in support of Senator Nelson's (D-WI) amendment to H.R. 18037 (introduced in June by Representative Flood, D-PA) regarding Teacher Corps: "In the dark world of poverty, one door that does remain is the one marked 'education.' With a good education, many opportunities can become available—jobs, income, advancement, housing. Without it all the other barriers remain. But a head start is not enough, for the dropout potential continues in our ghetto schools. Change all along the way is required if the disadvantaged child is to reach graduation. Teacher Corps members are change agents." The amendment is passed. H.R. 18037 passes the Senate on September 6 and later becomes Public Law 90-557. 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (September 5, 1968): 25804-25808. (Mondale at 25807)

    • Senator Mondale submits Amendment No. 269 to S. 2218, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (introduced May 20 by Senator Pell, D-RI), establishing a National Advisory Commission on School Finance: "We all recognize the importance of quality education to the Nation, as an investment in its human resources and as a source of strength for its democratic institutions. We further appreciate the importance of education to the individual, whose personal fulfillment and economic well-being in an increasingly complex society are closely related to his educational level. The solution to inadequacies and inequities in school finance cannot be postponed. The damage inflicted upon the undereducated individual is irreparable and inexcusable." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (November 5, 1969): 33019-33024.

    • Senator Mondale submits a series of amendments to S. 2218, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, authorizing funding for various educational programs and for libraries. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (November 13, 1969): 33992-33996.

    • Senator Mondale submits his testimony before the Labor, Housing, Education, and Welfare Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations urging the committee to recommend substantial increases in funding for education at all levels. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (December 5, 1969): 37335-37337.

    • Senator Mondale urges the Nixon administration to release the appropriated funds for education. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (December 17, 1969): 39581-39582.

    • Senator Mondale submits Amendment No. 641 to H.R. 16916 (reported to the Senate from the Committee on Appropriations May 15), increasing funds for dropout prevention programs. The bill passes the Senate on June 25, 1970. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (May 19, 1970): 16047.

    • President Nixon's veto message of H.R. 16916, a bill for appropriations for the Office of Education. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (August 11, 1970): 28170-28171.

    • Debate over President Nixon's veto of H.R. 16916; Mondale states, "I would like to see some of the burden of the fight against inflation borne by the ABM and other wasteful and unnecessary weapons systems. I would welcome a plea from the President to make reductions in the space program budget as a contribution to holding down prices. I do not want to place this burden upon the shoulders of our children. Investments in education are investments in the Nation's future." The Senate overrides the President's veto and the bill later becomes Public Law 91-380. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (August 18, 1970): 29318-29391. (Mondale at 29387)

    • Senator Mondale is angered by the administration's withholding of Title I funds appropriated to schools: "The effect on many of the programs which depend upon Title I funds may soon be abandonment or severe cutbacks in services. And the result for our children will be to once more be made victims of this administration's distorted priorities and their concern for bookkeeping over the education and welfare of our most needy children." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (October 14, 1970): 36935-36937.

    • Senator Mondale argues in favor of Amendment No. 1076 to amend H.R. 18515 (reported to the Senate from the Committee on Appropriations October 13), the Labor, HEW Appropriation Bill, striking a section of the bill that cut programs for the aged, blind, and children, calling it "most unfair and unwise." The amendment is agreed to. The bill passes the Senate and later becomes Public Law 91-667. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (November 20, 1970): 38299-38356.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment No. 1080 to S. 3883, The Emergency School Aid Act of 1970 (introduced by Senator Javits, D-NY, May 26 and referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare); the amendment authorizes $80 million in federal funds for research, development, and production of educational television programs for children: "Our children no longer have to wait until they reach school age to begin learning the three R's. 'Sesame Street' has changed all that." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (November 23, 1970): 38456-38461.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 3779, the Elementary and Secondary Education Assistance Act of 1972, providing federal financing to schools; he discusses the "desperate financial condition" of elementary and secondary education in his introduction. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (June 29, 1972): 23138-23148.

    • Senator Mondale expresses concern over the administration's "Better Schools Act of 1973," (introduced by Senator Dominick, R-CO, on March 22 as S. 1319) stating that it will have a "disastrous impact" on Minnesota's schools. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (May 10, 1973): 15185-15187.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2414, the Elementary and Secondary Education Assistance Act of 1973, increasing education aid to help reduce per pupil spending disparities among school districts, to provide urban school districts with sufficient funds, and to generally increase general education aid to states. The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (September 13, 1973): 29552-29558.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment No. 1330 to S. 1539, the Education Amendments of 1974 (introduced by Senator Pell, D-RI on April 11); his amendment funds programs in advanced mathematics for disadvantaged children. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 14, 1974): 14446-14459.

    • Senator Mondale speaks in favor of the committee bill for S. 1539, arguing against an amendment introduced by Senator McClellan (D-AR) that would change the funding structure for programs and schools. Senator McClellan's amendment is agreed to. H.R. 69 is passed in lieu of S. 1539 and becomes Public law 93-380. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 15, 1974): 14823-14838. (Mondale at 14834)

    • Debate on H.R. 16900 (reported from the Committee on Appropriations October 9), providing supplemental appropriations in 1975; Senator Mondale argues for his Amendment No. 1989, providing incentive grants to states that make a "higher than average effort to support elementary and secondary education." The amendment is agreed to. The Senate passes the bill and it later becomes Public Law 93-554. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (November 20, 1974): 36732-36774. (Mondale at 36736)

    • Senator Mondale expresses support for S. 6, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (introduced January 15 by Senator Williams, D-NJ): "It is clearly landmark legislation which holds the promise of new opportunity for the 7 million handicapped children in this country.... In the past, many children have been left to sit at home, providing little opportunity for adequate training and development. Under S. 6, priority is given to provision of a free appropriate public education to children not currently receiving any, as well as those currently receiving inadequate assistance." The bill is passed and becomes Public Law 94-142. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 18, 1975): 19478-19511. (Mondale at 19503)

    • Senator Mondale applauds Senator Pell (D-RI) for acting "expeditiously" on H.R. 8304 (introduced and passed in the Senate on December 17), assuring funding for "right to read" programs such as Reading is Fundamental. It becomes Public Law 94-194. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (December 19, 1975): 42095-42098.

    • Debate on S. 2657, the Education Amendments of 1976 (reported from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare on May 17); Senator Mondale's statement is submitted by Senator Muskie (D-ME): "The bill before us today represents the Committee's attempt to improve the quality of education in this country and provide access to education to all Americans, regardless of their age, sex or socio-economic status. I urge my colleagues to give it their most enthusiastic support." The bill is passed and later becomes Public Law 94-482. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (August 27, 1976): 28148-28192. (Mondale at 28178)


    Children's Health and Nutrition, including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome
    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment No. 515 to S. 2548, improving the special food service program for preschool and school-age children; he gives a history of the program designed to improve the nutritional status of preschool and school-age children on a year-round basis. H.R. 515 is passed in lieu of S. 2548 and becomes Public Law 91-248. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (February 23, 1970): 4378-4380, 4401-4429, 4492-4516. (Mondale at 4408)

    • Senator Mondale introduces Senate Joint Resolution 163, to assure every school child a free or reduced-priced lunch: "I believe it is of utmost importance for the Congress to take action to restore adequate funding and payment levels to the school lunch program. Now, just 1 month into the school year, some schools are already on the verge of abandoning lunch programs. Legislation I offer today is designed to achieve the urgent objectives of maintaining lunch programs in these schools and fulfilling the commitment made by Congress to an estimated 2 million hungry children in the United States." The measure is referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 30, 1971): 34133-34138.

    • Senate debates Senate Joint Resolution 157, to assure every school child a free or reduced-priced lunch; Senator Mondale expresses support for the resolution: "I cannot think of anything that is more disgraceful than living in this land of agricultural abundance, great wealth, and great power, and trying to save a few pennies on the school lunch program that is needed to provide nutritious meals for the schoolchildren of this country...." The resolution is passed. It is referred to the House Committee on Education and Labor. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (October 1, 1971): 34457-34489. (Mondale at 34471)

    • Senator Mondale expresses support for House Joint Resolution 923, providing nutritious school lunches for every needy child (introduced in October by Representative Perkins, D-KY); he provides details of recent activity on the topic and explains the differences between the administration's position and the House Joint Resolution. The measure passes and becomes Public Law 92-153. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (October 20, 1971): 37043-37047. (Mondale at 37045)

    • Senator Mondale announces hearings by the Subcommittee on Children and Youth on sudden infant death syndrome. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (January 20, 1972): 541-542.

    • Senator Mondale submits the testimony of Dr. Abraham B. Bergman, Judith Choate, Dr. Jay M. Arena, Dr. Merlin K. DuVal, and Saul Goldberg, witnesses before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, concerning sudden infant death syndrome. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (January 21, 1972): 1788-1801.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Senate Joint Resolution 206, on sudden infant death syndrome, "which I hope will stimulate a major initiative to solve one of the most tragic and perplexing problems that threaten American families...." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 17, 1972): 4441-4443.

    • Senator Mondale resubmits his statement from his opening remarks on Senate Joint Resolution 206 because the final two paragraphs of his statement were omitted in the first printing. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 25, 1972): 5634.

    • Senator Mondale submits correspondence with Elliot Richardson, Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, regarding the implementation of a program that provides early and periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment of health problems of children covered by Medicaid; HEW had, in Mondale's words, "dragged its feet in implementing this program." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (March 30, 1972): 11106-11108.

    • Senator Mondale submits statistics from the White House Conference on Children's publication "Profiles of Children," showing that many children have problems which go untreated; this is in response to the Finance Committee's postponement of services to 6 to 21 year olds on Medicaid. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (May 23, 1972): 18394.

    • Senate Joint Resolution 206 is amended and passed. Senator Mondale submits the report of the Labor and Public Welfare Committee on sudden infant death syndrome. The resolution is referred to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (June 7, 1972): 19985-19992.

    • Senator Mondale cosponsors Amendment No. 1431 to H.R. 14896, the National School Lunch Act (passed in House June 29 and reported August 8 from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry). The amendment ensures that children who participated in the previous year's free or reduced-price lunch program are still eligible, that states are not required to provide 25 percent in matching funds for the program, and that funding is available for a pilot program that would provide food assistance to pregnant women or women with children aged birth to four. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (August 10, 1972): 27740-27741.

    • Consideration of Senator Humphrey's (D-MN) amendment to H.R. 14896, to amend the National School Lunch Act, assuring adequate funds are available for summer food service programs for children living in poor economic conditions; Senator Mondale speaks in favor of Senator Humphrey's amendment. The amendment is passed. The bill is passed and becomes Public Law 92-433. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (August 16, 1972): 28579-28592. (Mondale at 28583)

    • Senator Mondale urges Congress to appropriate funds for school lunch programs: "I believe that the Federal Government must take all possible steps to assure that needy youngsters in these schools receive nutritious meals." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (April 11, 1973): 11899-11900.

    • *Senator Mondale introduces S. 1745, providing financial assistance for research into Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and cites a report written by the National Foundation for Sudden Infant Death that indicates "a desperate need for an immediate focus on SIDS to relieve the suffering of families who lose children and to find out why these children continue to die so mysteriously." Senator Mondale states: "For this reason today I am introducing legislation authorizing the creation of SIDS research centers; and authorizing support for information, counseling and training activities related to SIDS." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (May 8, 1973): 14693-14694.

    • Senator Mondale submits an analysis of the Nixon administration's performance in the area of child health by a New York citizens' committee for children: "In a careful review of maternal and child health, school lunch, Medicaid regulations, child development and other programs with child health components, the committee carefully documented the efforts of the administration to freeze or cut back vitally important initiatives for children." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (October 16, 1973): 34258-34259.

    • Senator Mondale applauds the Senate for passing S. 1745, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1973: "For nearly 2 years I have had a deep interest in the tragedy of crib death or sudden infant death syndrome. One of the most frustrating aspects of this disease is our inability to predict it or to prevent it from striking thousands of babies who give every appearance of being healthy. It is very gratifying to note the growth in both public and professional interest in SIDS. I am pleased that the Senate has passed and the House is considering the legislation needed to counsel families who lose children and to mount a major medical research effort." He submits articles from the New England Journal of Medicine on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (December 18, 1973): 42171-42173.

    • *Consideration of Senator Mondale's bill S. 1745, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974; the bill being considered is a compromise between the House and Senate bills. The Senate agrees to the House amendments with an additional Senate amendment. It becomes Public Law 93-270 in April. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (March 6, 1974): 5508-5515.

    • Senator Mondale expresses frustration at the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's "unwillingness" to fully implement a program that provides early diagnostic screening and treatment for poor children. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 18, 1974): 23975-23978.

    • Senator Mondale speaks in favor of H.R. 4222, the 1975 Amendments to the National School Lunch Act and Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (reported from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry in June); he calls special attention to the provision that directs the Secretary of Agriculture to require State education agencies to expand the program's coverage to "all schools where it is needed to provide adequate nutrition for children in attendance," believing that "it will substantially improve and expand the school breakfast program....[and] this will help poor children in their efforts to obtain high quality educations." The bill is passed. The House and Senate override the President's veto and it becomes Public Law 94-105. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 10, 1975): 22188-22224. (Mondale at 22217)


    The American Family
    • Senator Mondale submits expert statements given by Vincent P. Barabba, Edward Zigler, Robert Coles, and James O'Toole at the hearings on "American Families: Trends and Pressures." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (September 26, 1973): 31663-31672.

    • Senator Mondale submits expert statements given by Dr. Margaret Mead, Dr. Urie Bronfenbrenner, George B. Williams, and Dr. Harvey E. Brazer at the hearings on "American Families: Trends and Pressures." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (September 28, 1973): 31961-31973.

    • Senator Mondale submits expert statements given by Sophie B. Engel, Mrs. Morton A. Langsfeld, Jr., Rev. Msgr. James T. McHugh, Rev. Msgr. Lawrence J. Corcoran, Rev. William H. Genne, Leon Smith, Chris Hobgood, Dr. Andrew Billingsley, and Dr. Gunnar Dybwad from the third day of testimony on "American Families: Trends and Pressures." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (October 1, 1973): 32204-32220.

    • Congressman Charles B. Rangel (D-NY) submits an article written by Senator Mondale entitled, "The Burdened Family," in which Senator Mondale discusses his work on the Subcommittee on Children and Youth. Congressman Rangel praises Senator Mondale: "We are lucky to have in the Congress a man whose work as chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Children and Youth has shown the way to a more compassionate and sensitive view of this problem." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (June 4, 1974): 17626-17627.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 2250, providing funds for a program of research concerning pressures on families: "During my decade in the Senate, I have served on as many or more of what might be called human problem committees as any one of my colleagues.... For much of this time we have been dealing with problems that have often been directly related to pressures on families: housing problems, welfare problems, nutritional problems, the health problems, and all the rest. The more I have focused on these problems, the more I am convinced of the absolute centrality and fundamental importance of healthy families in American life as the key, best, and superior way of raising children. There is really no substitute for a healthy family in developing a secure, physically sound, motivated child who has a sense of worth. And that is the base for a good citizen—a person who can be a participating and contributing member of society." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 31, 1975): 26549-26551.


    Higher Education
    • Debate on H.R. 9567, the Higher Education Act of 1965 (reported September 1 from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare); Senator Mondale strongly supports the act, stating that "the federal government must play an increased role in supporting higher education." In particular, he speaks in favor of the work study provisions of the bill, which eliminates a rigid income ceiling, leaving it to universities and colleges to determine student eligibility. The bill is passed and becomes Public Law 89-329. 89th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 111 (September 2, 1965): 22684-22717. (Mondale at 22705)

    • Senator Mondale expresses disappointment in the failure to appropriate sufficient funds for federal assistance to colleges and universities for community service and continuing education programs: "Surely one-fifth of the amount authorized by Congress last year is hardly an excessive amount to support a program which can make such a valuable contribution to universities and the communities they serve." 89th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 112 (September 28, 1966): 24242-24257. (Mondale at 24256)

    • Senator Muskie (D-ME) submits Senator Mondale's commencement address at Kansas State College, entitled "Education and Public Responsibility." 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (June 16, 1967): 16149-16151.

    • Senator Morse (D-OR) submits Senator Mondale's commencement address at Anoka-Ramsey Junior College. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (July 25, 1967): 20130-20131.

    • Senator Williams (D-NJ) submits a speech by Senator Mondale to the American Association of Junior Colleges: "This speech constitutes an important contribution to the continuing discussion of how this Nation must meet society's growing demands on the education process." 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (March 10, 1969): 5715-5716.

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 1788, the Student Assistance Act of 1969: "Because these 'working poor' live their lives in incessant struggle so quietly, they are sometimes called the 'forgotten Americans.' It is time that they be forgotten no longer. Many of these parents dream of sending their children to college. Some, through fantastic sacrifice, are able to do so. Most are not. It is time this Nation do something to help them realize their dreams. It is time to relieve them of some of their struggle. After all, it is not just the individual family or child that benefits from post-secondary or higher education. The benefit to society is just as large. And it is time for this government to assume a larger share of the cost of college educations. The poor and the low-income working man—these are the people this bill will help. Both are caught in a vicious cycle of poverty. Their low levels of training lead to low-paying jobs—or to no job at all. There is no money to pay for education. And this is passed from one generation to another and another and another. We must break this cycle now." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (April 14, 1969): 8775-8783.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Senate Joint Resolution 109 establishing a commission to study student unrest on college and university campuses. The measure is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (May 12, 1969): 12105-12116.

    • Senator Mondale submits his commencement speech at St. Olaf College, in which he tried to put student unrest into perspective and lists several conclusions he had arrived at: violence cannot be tolerated on campuses; forcible suppression of unrest is just as deadly as violence; students are becoming the most dynamic element of the American political system; much of student unrest has nothing to do with the campus itself, but is a reflection of the unrest, the contradictions, and the disarray of American life. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (May 26, 1969): 13681-13683.

    • Consideration of H.R. 11400 (passed by the House May 21 and reported June 12 from the Committee on Appropriations); Senator Mondale argues to restore money cut from the educational opportunity grants program: "We will be keeping faith both with our institutions of higher learning and with our most disadvantaged students." The bill is passed and becomes Public Law 91-47. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (June 17, 1969): 16128-16133. (Mondale at 16132)

    • Senator Mondale expresses disappointment that the 1969 Second Supplemental Appropriations Bill Conference Report (H.R. 11400) did not include supplemental funding for the educational opportunities grants program: "Reductions in educational investments are simply false economies. I believe that the conference committee decision not to include any supplemental [funds] for the educational opportunity grant program was a serious mistake, just as I believe the administration's proposed budget reductions in education programs for fiscal year 1970 are serious mistakes. I am disappointed that this effort to keep the educational opportunity grant program operating at a steady level has been unsuccessful, and I pledge my support for efforts to assure that important programs of federal aid to education—from preschool education to elementary and secondary, higher education and adult education—are funded at a fuller and more adequate level in fiscal year 1970." 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (July 9, 1969): 18925-18941. (Mondale at 18930)

    • Senator Mondale discusses the difficulties students face in financing their education and he expresses hope that cuts to student aid will be reversed. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (July 29, 1969): 21130-21131.

    • Senator Mondale speaks in support of S. 2721, the Insured Student Loan Emergency Amendments (introduced July 29 by Senator Javits, D-NY), a bill providing federal subsidies to lenders in order to ensure student loans for low and middle income students. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (August 12, 1969): 23415-23433. (Mondale at 23423)

    • Senator Mondale urges his colleagues to adopt H.R. 13194 (passed in lieu of S. 2721), the Emergency Insured Student Loan Act of 1969 Conference Report; he is pleased that two important principles from the original Senate bill were kept: increased authorizations for the national defense student-loan program, the college work-study program, and the educational opportunity grant program; prohibiting discrimination by lending institutions in making guaranteed student loans. The bill is passed and becomes Public Law 91-95. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (October 13, 1969): 29584-29590. (Mondale at 29590)

    • Senator Mondale introduces S. 1161, the Student Assistant Act of 1971, removing the financial barriers to higher education: "It is estimated that over a million young people must forgo college today, not because they lack ability or desire, but because they lack the necessary money. Unless we do something now to eliminate these inequities and end this waste of manpower, higher education may once again become the privilege of the wealthy few." The bill is referred to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (March 9, 1971): 5474-5478.

    • Senator Mondale submits the testimony of higher education leaders, Richard C. Hawk, Robert P. Van Tries, Donald K. Smith, Phillip C. Hellend, G. Theodore Mitau, and Edgar Carlson, before the Senate Education Subcommittee. The testimonies provide a case study of higher education in Minnesota. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (May 6, 1971): 13896-13908.

    • Final debate on S. 659, a bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 and the Vocational Education Act of 1963 (reported August 3 by Senator Pell, D-RI, from the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare); Senator Mondale voices support for the bill. The bill is passed. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (August 6, 1971): 30481-30500. (Mondale at 30495)

    • Senator Mondale asks Senator Pell (D-RI) for clarification regarding the provisions in S. 659 concerning the establishment of a National Foundation for Higher Education. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 28, 1972): 5797-5801.

    • Debate on the conference report on S. 659; despite the many programs established by the conference report that Senator Mondale supports, he does not support the final report. In response to Congressman Broomfield's (R-MI) amendment to postpone the transfer or transportation of children to achieve segregation, Senator Mondale states: "I do not think we can compromise the basic human rights even for a magnificent program of higher education such as that embodied here. Therefore, in sorrow, and not in anger, I cannot support the conference report." The conference report is agreed to. The bill later becomes Public Law 92-318. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (May 24, 1972): 18842-18863. (Mondale at 18845)

    • Senator Mondale expresses his opposition to the proposed rules for the family contribution schedule for higher education: "I was shocked to learn this week that the proposed rules would discriminate severely against young people from farm families or families which operate small businesses. This discrimination would occur because the assets needed to operate a farm or small business would be treated in the proposed formula in the same way as all other assets, including stocks and bonds and savings accounts." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (February 28, 1973): 5806-5807.

    • Senator Mondale summarizes the time line of communication with John Ottina, U.S. Commissioner of Education-Designate regarding the family contribution schedule for a student's education; he submits the correspondence regarding the new student aid program for higher education, also known as the "Pell grant program." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (July 13, 1973): 23833-23840.

    • Senator Mondale expresses enthusiasm for recent changes to federal scholarship aid to college students: "The basic educational opportunity grant program is one of the most promising and important programs enacted in recent years. I hope very much that we can, through further modifications of some of its existing regulations, improve it to the point where it can truly provide the kind of assistance so desperately needed by many families and young people across the country." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (December 4, 1973): 39478-39488.

    • Senator Mondale submits Amendment No. 1329 to S. 1539, the Education Amendments of 1974; the amendment is designed to continue federal support for disadvantaged students studying law. H.R. 69 is passed in lieu of S. 1539 and becomes Public Law 93-380. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 16, 1974): 15110-15126. (Mondale at 15112)

    • Senator Mondale reacts to President Ford's veto of H.R. 12628, the Vietnam-Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974 (passed by the House February 19 and sent to the Senate June 19 where it replaced S. 2784); Senator Mondale calls the veto a "cruel blow" to the men and women who served in Vietnam: "We could help these veterans with welfare or unemployment benefits, or we can help them with educational benefits. I choose the latter." Both the House and Senate override the veto and the bill becomes Public law 93-508. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (December 3, 1974): 37836-37852. (Mondale at 37850).

    • Senator Mondale submits the remarks made at a hearing of the Subcommittee on Education hearing by leaders of postsecondary education in Minnesota: Sister Joyce Rowland, Richard C. Hawk, Dr. Philip C. Hellend, Dr. C. Peter Magrath, Dr. G. Theodore Mitau, and Robert P. Van Tries. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 24, 1975): 24651-24662.

    • Senator Mondale introduces Amendment No. 1376 and 1377 to S. 2657, a bill to extend the Higher Education and Vocational Acts (referred February 3 to the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare); Amendment No. 1376 "would encourage states to develop and expand their efforts toward increased educational planning and cooperation on an interstate and regional basis." Amendment No. 1377 would provide financial assistance for higher education to middle-income families. The bill is passed August 27 and becomes Public Law 94-482. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (February 3, 1976): 2046-2048.

    • Citing his concern over the "tremendous cost squeeze of post-secondary education on middle-income families," Senator Mondale introduces S. 3487, a bill providing income tax credit for post-secondary education costs. The bill is referred to the Committee on Finance. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (May 26, 1976): 15544-15545.


    Child Abuse

    Speeches & Publications Submitted
    • Senator Mondale submits numerous letters supporting the school lunch and special milk programs: "The reduction in funds requested by the Budget Bureau ignores the facts that such a cut would harm the dairy industry, would harm the school children now receiving the benefits of these programs, and would make necessary a means test as a qualification for receiving milk or food under the program.... if we thought a means test for receiving medical care benefits for the aged was demeaning and an insult, this would be even more true for children in school." 89th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 112 (February 23, 1966): 3854-3856.

    • Senator Mondale submits an editorial from The Washington Post supporting his Amendment No. 537, requiring automobile manufacturers to notify consumers with defective cars. 89th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 112 (May 5, 1966): 9957-9958.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the importance of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for deprived children and submits an article, "Law 89-10 Adds a New Dimension for the Silent Ones," published in the Minnesota Journal of Education. The article details a teacher's observations of the positive effects of the act on four children. Mondale states that "too often the impact of this new program is measured by the amount of money which is being spent. Seldom do we hear of its impact on the individual children whose very lives hang in the balance. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (January 19, 1967): 995-996.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article by Senator Proxmire (D-WI) arguing for truth in lending legislation. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (March 21, 1967): 7492-7495.

    • Senator Mondale calls the National Teacher Corps "one of the most valuable of the Great Society programs" because it "has done much to break down the resistance to education in poverty-stricken areas;" he submits an article from the Minneapolis Tribune describing the Teacher Corps program and its effectiveness in Minneapolis. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (April 12, 1967): 9233-9234.

    • Senator Mondale submits the testimony of Shelby Southward, The Cooperative League of the USA, supporting S. 5, the Truth in Lending bill. 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (April 26, 1967): 10917.

    • Praising the author for "getting the facts first" and not being content "to sit back and call it [Headstart] another tax drain," Senator Mondale submits an editorial from the Messenger (Marshall, MN), entitled "Headstart: Tax Dollars Well Spent." 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (August 10, 1967): 22187-22188.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article disclosing improper conditions at six plants of the nation's largest meatpacking firms: "It is now apparent that some of the largest meat packing firms in the country purchase or establish intrastate meat plants to avoid federal inspection and thereby reduce costs for what they regard to be important competitive reasons. Thus, it becomes perfectly apparent that while we should offer to help the states by sharing the costs of adequate inspection, we must also insist that standards comparable to those of federal inspection be required for all meat sold to consumers of this nation." 90th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 113 (November 8, 1967): 31716-31718.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article by Senator Proxmire (D-WI) analyzing the background of the Truth in lLnding bill and approaches to protecting consumer interests. 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (March 6, 1968): 5482-5483.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from the National Observer concerning the activities of Consumers Union, an organization that has "been at the forefront of efforts to provide American consumers with objective and impartial appraisals of a wide range of products." 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (March 20, 1968): 7126-7128.

    • Senator Mondale submits a series of articles from the Louisville Courier-Journal and Times covering meat-inspection. 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (March 21, 1968): 7301-7306.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article and testimony by Senator Hart (D-MI) discussing the harmful effects of antitrust enforcement. 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (April 23, 1968): 10286-10287.

    • Senator Mondale expresses concern over cuts in the school lunch program; he submits reports on the inadequacy of the school lunch program. 90th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 114 (May 24, 1968): 14933-14937.

    • Senator Mondale submits a speech by Senator Williams (D-NJ) to the New Jersey State Federation of District Boards of Education: "This important speech sets the framework for the Comprehensive Community College Act of 1969." 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (February 19, 1969): 3908-3909.

    • Senator Mondale submits a questionnaire that addresses a number of questions people have asked about the Student Assistance Act of 1969. He states, "The bill, if enacted, would do much toward expanding the higher education opportunity structure in this country. It would also be one of the most efficient ways to help millions break out of the cycle of poverty." 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (April 22, 1969): 9886-9887.

    • Senator Mondale discusses S. 2060, the Head Start Child Development Act of 1969, explaining that the bill "is designed to bring needed nutritional, educational, and health services to poor children in the early years of life." He submits a letter from the Child Welfare League of America supporting the Head Start Child Development Act of 1969. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (June 5, 1969): 14863-14864.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the need for new and improved facilities at colleges and universities; he submits an editorial from the Minneapolis Tribune discussing this need. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (July 1, 1969): 18020-18021.

    • Senator Mondale summarizes and submits letters from Minnesota principals making recommendations for improvements in education. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (July 9, 1969): 18883-18887.

    • Senator Mondale submits two articles exploring present policies in the drug industry concerning pricing and current testing and evaluation procedures. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (October 6, 1969): 28604-28606.

    • Senator Mondale discusses his support of additional appropriations for education and health programs and the need to override the President's threatened veto of the appropriation; he submits an article by Senator Yarborough (D-TX) discussing the need for government funding of educational programs for handicapped children. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (October 21, 1969): 30681-30682.

    • Senator Mondale summarizes and submits a report by the National Advisory Council on Education Professions Development; the report documents how the federal government has failed to meet its responsibilities to education and makes a case to Congress to reorder national priorities. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (November 26, 1969): 35926-35927.

    • Senator Mondale summarizes his reasons for voting in favor of additional funding for education and health programs; he submits an article from the Minneapolis Tribune discussing the importance of additional federal funding of schools. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (January 21, 1970): 518-520.

    • Senate Mondale discusses the importance of devoting time and resources to "finding new and more effective ways to educate our children and ourselves;" he submits an article from American Education describing a program in Bloomington, MN that encourages teachers to experiment with innovative approaches to education. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (January 21, 1970): 532-533.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The New York Times discussing the economic crisis and inflation. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (April 1, 1970): 9960-9961.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from the Saint Paul Pioneer Press discussing malnutrition among children. The article states: "The true test of this Nation's will to end hunger and malnutrition is whether we can insure an adequate diet to every child in America. We have failed to do so in the past, and the tragedy of hunger and malnutrition in this country is largely a result of this failure." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (May 12, 1970): 15084-15085.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article written by Dr. Richard P. Bailey, President of Hamline University, in which he provides "an example of a president and a campus in which reason and respect have prevailed" as opposed to turbulence experienced on other university campuses. 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (July 23, 1970): 25547-25548.

    • Senator Mondale expresses dismay at a recent article in The Washington Post discussing substandard conditions in Washington D.C. schools: "I think this report states the fact that here in the Nation's Capital thousands and thousands of children are being doomed by being denied the basic tools of reading and arithmetic which are necessary for any achievement in American society." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (July 31, 1970): 26791-26793.

    • Senator Mondale introduces an address Senator Kennedy (D-MA) delivered at Boston University: "The turbulence on our Nation's campuses is one of the most disturbing and perplexing developments we face. We are in very real danger of losing that essential bond between the university and society at large. And with it, we stand to lose much of the potential for our future as a free and progressive nation. We begin to repair that bond with a new understanding--a new understanding by students of the society in which they live, as well as a better understanding of students by their elders." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (September 14, 1970): 31560-31562.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article discussing the lack of high quality day care: "I am convinced that we need to expand our day care services, but that these services must emphasize education, health, and nutrition components, or we will be failing our children and our country. The creation of inexpensive, sterile, institutionalized babysitting centers could be a tragic mistake." 91st Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 116 (December 3, 1970): 39701-39702.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The North Branch Review (North Branch, MN) entitled "Justice for Children": "I think that one of the strangest and most tragic of our many national anomalies is the reverence we pay toward youth contrasted with the terrible indifference we reflect in our support of programs and policies designed to bring truly free and full opportunity to every child." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (March 10, 1971): 5786.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the major questions and issues confronting child-development efforts and submits a series from The Washington Post that addresses these questions. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (March 19, 1971): 7216-7222.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from the Minneapolis Tribune concerning the critical needs of children during the first years of life: "This editorial ... is a sensitive report on the need for better and more extensive child development services and day care centers throughout the Nation for both poor and non-poor children." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (May 18, 1971): 15529-15530.

    • Senator Mondale discusses and submits articles describing a successful experiment in early childhood education at the University of Wisconsin: "In this project ... children from the Milwaukee slums, whose parents were both poor and illiterate, have excelled as a result of the specialized treatment. Many of the children, whose mothers had IQ's of 70 points have achieved intelligence quotients as high as 135." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (August 3, 1971): 28993-28997.

    • Senator Mondale submits the remarks of Helen Baine, President of the National Education Association. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (August 6, 1971): 30304-30308.

    • Senator Mondale submits an editorial from the Minneapolis Tribune on the significance of a new child development center in Minneapolis: "This child development program ... represents an extremely promising initiative in the field of development day care. It is symbolic of the encouraging day care initiatives in the Minneapolis area under the creative leadership of the Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 17, 1971): 32348.

    • Senator Mondale submits a list of the organizations that helped develop the Comprehensive Child Development Act. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 20, 1971): 32499.

    • Senator Mondale submits a series of articles from the St. Paul Pioneer Press on Minnesota's Head Start program: "The articles' analysis of the need for parental involvement in these programs; their review of the benefits both children and their parents have derived from child development activities, and their balanced assessment of the problems and potentials in development day care, provide an extremely useful insight into existing and proposed day care programs." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (September 23, 1971): 33045-33050.

    • Senator Mondale announces the submission of an advertisement in The Washington Post by the Children's Lobby supporting the Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971 and a resolution by The National Association for the Education of Young Children urging President Nixon to support the Comprehensive Child Development Act. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (November 12, 1971): 40881-40882.

    • Senator Mondale submits a two-part series from the St. Paul Dispatch discussing child development and the need for quality day care: "This very thoughtful series points out both the need for day care in society today,and the dangers of purely custodial settings. It elaborates on the many differing views surrounding the idea of "child development" and early childhood education, and reviews the changes being made in licensing requirements.... [A]t a time when the Congress is considering the day care child development provisions contained in S. 2007, this informative review of the entire preschool proposal is very timely." 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (November 30, 1971): 43562-43563.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article detailing a successful child care program in Little Rock, AR: "In view of the fears and misconceptions that have been raised and nurtured during the consideration of child care legislation, I think it is important for my colleagues in the Senate to have a chance to understand the values of one kind of quality day care which could have been funded under the child development legislation that was recently vetoed." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (January 20, 1972): 547-548.

    • Senator Mondale submits the statement of Mrs. Ben W. Heineman, President of the Child Welfare League of America, comparing the child welfare bill President Nixon vetoed (S. 2007) and H.R. 1, the administration's proposed welfare reform bill. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (January 20, 1972): 551.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The New York Times by Drs. Urie Bronfenbrenner and Jerome Bruner, calling it "an accurate and distressing account of the vital need for substantive day care opportunities for the nearly 6 million preschool children whose mothers are working." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 2, 1972): 2321-2322.

    • Senator Mondale submits a position paper supporting the creation of the National Foundation of Post-Secondary Education. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (February 2, 1972): 2353-2357.

    • Senator Mondale submits the newsletter of the American Academy of Pediatrics stating that the Academy has signed a contract with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare expanding and improving the Head Start medical consultation services for children. He highlights two important provisions: hiring and training twelve regional health specialists to develop and coordinate health services to fit the needs of local program personnel; self-evaluation of Head Start at the local level. 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (March 20, 1972): 9070-9071.

    • Senator Mondale submits two articles concerning day care: "Both articles ignore the heated rhetoric and scare tactics which regrettably surround the passage and the veto of last year's child development bill and help us to focus on the real issues involved." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (March 21, 1972): 9288-9290.

    • Senator Mondale submits a letter from Carl A. Laughlin, President of the American Dental Association, concerning dental care for poor children; the Committee on Finance voted recently to postpone for two years full implementation of a dental and vision screening program for children on Medicaid. Senator Mondale states, "I submit this material in support of my previously announced efforts to preserve and strengthen the early screening, diagnosis, and treatment program for children from zero to twenty one years old whose families are covered by medicaid." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (April 19, 1972): 13438-13439.

    • Senator Mondale submits materials concerning the importance of vision screening for children and youth: "This information is being placed in the Record in support of my previously announced intention to attempt to reverse the restrictive actions of the Finance Committee on this important program. Specifically, the committee voted to postpone full implementation of the program by 2 years—to July 1, 1975—and not to require all States to provide certain services within the program. Children in as many as 18 States, for example, could be deprived of eyeglasses they need if the Finance Committee's action is allowed to stand." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (May 23, 1972): 18384-18386.

    • Senator Mondale submits excerpts from a study entitled "Windows on Day Care: A Report Based on Findings of the National Council of Jewish Women:" "The report of the council documents the disgraceful inadequacy of existing day care services in this country. By now most of us have heard the statistics: that there are almost 6 million children under the age of 6 whose mothers are working, but only 700,000 licensed day care slots available to serve them." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (July 18, 1972): 24210-24215.

    • Senator Mondale submits text of resolutions adopted by the newly formed "Children's Lobby:" "I do not necessarily agree with all these recommendations. But whether or not I, or any other elected official, agree with every one of the positions this lobby takes is unimportant. What is important is that the children's lobby is helping all of us to focus on how Government actions affect children...." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (August 17, 1972): 28692-28696.

    • Senator Mondale submits a speech by Sargent Shriver on the American family; he calls the speech "an honest review of the pressures many families are under, and a compassionate philosophy for strengthening and supporting them." 92nd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 118 (October 13, 1972): 35761-35764.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the difficulties in diagnosing child abuse soon enough; he submits editorials on the prevention and treatment of child abuse. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (February 14, 1973): 4287-4293.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the "health crisis of this affluent Nation" and states that "despite our great resources, many needy persons go unserved because of the inefficiency of our health delivery system." He submits an editorial announcing a children's hospital that recently opened in Minneapolis and calls Minnesota "a leader in the provision of health care to residents of the State and of the Nation." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (February 26, 1973): 5303.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the attempts of the Subcommittee on Children and Youth "to find solutions to the complicated problems of preventing and treating child abuse;" he submits an article from The National Observer describing the methods used by the University of Colorado Medical School when working with families of abused children. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (March 26, 1973): 9430-9432.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The Washington Post entitled "Suffer the Little Children:" "I was both touched and angered by the testimony presented to the subcommittee. I was touched by the personal story of a reformed child abuser who has now devoted her life to working with other parents who have the same terrible problem of being unable to control their anger against their children. And I was angered and disappointed by testimony demonstrating the disorganized, callous way that the Federal Government has dealt—or more accurately, not dealt—with this problem in the past." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (March 28, 1973): 9963-9964.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from the Minneapolis Tribune concerning the impact the administration's new regulations would have on a four year old girl in Minneapolis. Of the regulations, Mondale says, "We [senators] have tried to emphasize the severe and tragic impact these regulations would have on individuals currently benefiting from day care programs, alcohol and drug abuse programs, day activity centers for the retarded and other programs currently made possible through Social Services. It is one thing to talk in Washington about the statistics involved, but it is quite another to see first-hand the individuals who needs these programs so desperately. I had the opportunity last week to visit a day care center in Minneapolis and talk with working mothers who depend on that center to keep themselves and their children off the welfare rolls. It is a sobering experience to visit one of these centers while HEW's sword of Damocles is threatening the self reliance of those who use it; I strongly recommend such a visit to anyone who doubts the value of the Social Services program." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (March 28, 1973): 9968-9969.

    • Senator Mondale submits editorials from The Washington Post and The Evening Star concerning the need to take action to end child abuse. "In my years in the Senate I have never seen more compelling evidence as I have in this last week that immediate action is required on a problem. One grisly story after another appears in the Washington papers. For example, an infant died recently after being returned to a home which the authorities knew was not safe." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (April 11, 1973): 11903-11904.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from Redbook magazine describing the crippling effects of malnutrition on infants and the dramatic results of a nutrition program in Memphis, TN. He criticizes the executive branch for failing to spend appropriated funds on a nationwide effort to eliminate malnutrition among the very young. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (April 17, 1973): 12698-12700.

    • Senator Mondale discusses legislation he has introduced to make research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome a priority; he submits articles on crib death from The Washington Post and Reader's Digest93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (May 16, 1973): 15977-15978.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from the St. Paul Pioneer Press about an effective child abuse program in Minnesota: "The article about the Minnesota program touches on some of the themes that have been developed by witnesses during the subcommittee's hearings—including the need of battering parents for assistance in coping with family problems." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (May 21, 1973): 16226-16227.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The Washington Post reporting on the increase in number of reported child abuse cases: "One of the main goals of the subcommittee's study has been to bring to the attention of the public the need for reporting the cases of child abuse so that youngsters can be protected from threatening situations before they are permanently harmed. For this reason I was both pleased and saddened to read in the May 17 issue of The Washington Post that the number of reported cases of child abuse in the Washington area has increased significantly in recent weeks. While I am saddened to know that acts of violence against children continue to occur, I am heartened to learn that the public is apparently becoming more aware of its role in helping to prevent and identify child abuse." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (May 29, 1973): 17080-17081.

    • Senator Mondale submits an editorial from the Minneapolis Tribune criticizing President Nixon's proposed tax on gasoline. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (June 18, 1973): 19989-19990.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article discussing two approaches to treating child abuse: disciplinary treatment programs and rehabilitation of the family unit. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (June 21, 1973): 20676-20677.

    • Senator Mondale discusses efforts in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN to prevent, identify, and treat child abuse; he submits an article from the Minneapolis Star Tribune supporting his bill, S. 1191. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (June 30, 1973): 22579.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article entitled "The Crisis in Day Care," detailing "the history of the fight in Congress to obtain legislation which would alleviate some of the many problems now facing families in which both parents work." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (July 10, 1973): 22923-22924.

    • Senator Mondale submits responses from superintendents in Minnesota questioned about the "Better Schools Act;" all said the public schools in Minnesota would be adversely affected by the Act. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (August 3, 1973): 27908-27910.

    • Senator Mondale states: "It has been and is still our aim to create the momentum necessary to pass a bill which will provide support for families who lose children to the disease; as well as adequate research funds." He submits articles from The Washington Post and Ebony on crib death and its impact on families. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (September 24, 1973): 31050-31052.

    • Senator Mondale submits an editorial from the St. Paul Pioneer Press which includes "a clear and concise statement of the goals" of the Subcommittee on Children and Youth's hearings on American families. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (October 23, 1973): 34814.

    • Senator Mondale submits an editorial from The New York Times discussing corporate donations to American universities; Senator Mondale calls the implications of this involvement "extremely disturbing" and states, "To begin insisting on some specific return or result for every corporate contribution would impose a serious and unnecessary limitation on the freedom and autonomy of our higher education institutions." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (November 13, 1973): 36802-36803.

    • Senator Mondale submits the second of five articles entitled "Annals of Industry: Casualties of the Workplace," describing "one of the most frightening accounts I have ever read of the effects of unsafe working conditions--in this instance, exposure to asbestos--on workers." 93rd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 119 (November 27, 1973): 38102-38112.

    • Senator Mondale submits the first of five articles entitled "Annals of Industry: Casualties of the Workplace," dealing with the hazards of asbestos manufacture. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (March 4, 1974): 5073-5082.

    • Senator Mondale submits the third of five articles entitled "Annals of Industry: Casualties of the Workplace," dealing with the hazards of asbestos manufacture. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (March 12, 1974): 6392-6401.

    • Senator Mondale submits a guide to programs administered by the Office of Education for fiscal year 1974: "The guide clearly and simply outlines the types of assistance available, the amounts appropriated, and basic application information." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (April 9, 1974): 10317-10322.

    • Senator Mondale submits two articles that discuss action taken on the state and local levels to eliminate sex discrimination in education. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (April 10, 1974): 10461.

    • Senator Mondale commends Newsweek for calling attention to the problems faced by families with emotionally disturbed or handicapped children. He submits an article entitled "Troubled Children: The Quest for Help." 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (April 10, 1974): 10472-10475.

    • Senator Moss (D-UT) submits Senator Mondale's statement on his amendment to S. 354, the National No-Fault Motor Vehicle Insurance Act. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (April 22, 1974): 11226.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the need for day care licensing at the state level; he submits text of the Day Care Facility Licensing Act. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (May 6, 1974): 13189-13193.

    • Senator Mondale discusses research that has shown the positive impact of adequate medical services on child health and he expresses concern that the health proposals before Congress "contain serious shortcomings." He submits two articles that explore the "health status" of the nation's children. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 9, 1974): 22402-22404.

    • Senator Mondale expresses hope that the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act signed into law earlier in the year "will provide the extra support needed by agencies like Child Protective Services of Hennepin County to serve battered and neglected children and their families." He submits an article on child abuse published in the Minneapolis Star. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 18, 1974): 23984-23986.

    • Senator Mondale is pleased that the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare is beginning to recognize the problem of runaway youth; he submits a number of articles on runaways from Youth Alternatives, a publication of the National Youth Alternatives Project. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 30, 1974): 25758-25760.

    • Senator Mondale states: "Clearly, parents and campers have a right to expect that the camps that they attend are safe and responsible. They have a right to expect that those few camps which do not meet minimum health and safety standards will not be permitted to operate until violations are corrected;" he submits an article from The Washington Post on the need for federal legislation for youth camp safety. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (July 30, 1974): 25763-25764.

    • Senator Mondale submits a letter supporting Amendment No. 1521. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (August 22, 1974): 29845-29846.

    • Senator Mondale summarizes and submits a speech by Albert Shanker, President of the American Federation of Teachers. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (October 16, 1974): 35797-35800.

    • Senator Mondale applauds the news media for its "continuing commitment... to increasing public understanding" of child abuse; he submits a series of five articles published in The Christian Science Monitor on the subject. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (November 20, 1974): 36698-36704.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the implementation and success of the Right to Read program in Minnesota; he submits an article discussing the program. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (January 27, 1975): 1394-1396.

    • Senator Mondale submits a Library of Congress analysis of President Ford's 1976 Education Budget: "The Library of Congress study indicates that the President's budget for education generally, and elementary and secondary education particularly, is simply intolerable. At a time when the need for increased Federal assistance to education is growing, this budget proposes decreases. As one Senator, I want to announce at this point that I will be doing all I can to turn this budget proposal around." 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (February 19, 1975): 3478-3479.

    • Senator Mondale submits a report by the New York City Bar Association's Special Committee on Consumer Affairs endorsing S. 1509, the Anti-Pyramid Sales Bill. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (April 29, 1975): 12298.

    • Senator Mondale submits a transcript from a National Public Radio program aired March 14, 1975 entitled, "Who Cares for Children?" The transcript includes a description and discussion of S. 626 (introduced by Senator Mondale) and H.R. 2966, the Child and Family Services Acts, and interviews "latch key" children who are in need of supervised care that is not available. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (May 20, 1975): 15271-15276.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from The New York Times Magazine: "I believe that this poignant description of young lives too often doomed to suffering, disease, even death in our cities will be of particular interest to my distinguished colleagues. These children underscore the great need for comprehensive health care and family assistance services that can prevent their senseless tragedies and restore their rights to full, vibrant lives." 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (June 5, 1975): 17344-17346.

    • Senator Mondale submits remarks by Senator Ribicoff's (D-CT) administrative assistant, Geoffrey Peterson, in Stamford, CT, concerning the need for comprehensive programs to meet the health, nutrition, and day care needs of children. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 9, 1975): 21936.

    • Senator Mondale submits an address given by Orville G. Brim, President of The American Orthopsychiatric Association, outlining the steps needed to "link traditional research and services in child care to national policies designed to help families and children." 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (July 24, 1975): 24630-24632.

    • Senator Mondale discusses a conference on adolescent child abuse recently held at the University of Minnesota: "This conference was particularly important because, as the director of the national child abuse prevention and treatment program said in his remarks, it is particularly difficult to define and diagnose abuse of adolescents." He submits a Saint Paul Pioneer Press article about the conference. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (December 18, 1975): 41586-41587.

    • Senator Mondale is pleased that a number of newspapers have investigated the charges against the Child and Family Services Act "contained in a widely circulated, unsigned flyer;" he submits articles from a variety of newspapers denouncing the dishonest attack. 94th Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 121 (December 18, 1975): 41587-41588.

    • Senator Mondale submits a letter from John R. Roach, the Archbishop of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, supporting the Child and Family Services Act and speaking out against the attacks on the act: "The attacks on that bill are dishonest and we, as the Bishops of Minnesota, deplore them." 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (January 26, 1976): 946.

    • Senator Mondale submits articles rebutting attacks on the Child and Family Services Act: "In recent months the Child and Family Services Act has been the subject of a totally fraudulent propaganda campaign in Minnesota and other states. The literature being circulated about the bill is generally unsigned and is completely unfounded. Among the allegations being advanced about the bill are that it would somehow undermine religious instruction and would somehow take the authority for child-rearing from families and turn it over to the State. The literature also claims that provisions of a so-called Charter of Children's Rights—which was actually drafted in Britain—is part of this bill. These charges are totally without foundation." 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (February 5, 1976): 2583-2584.

    • Senator Mondale submits news releases from the United Methodist and the American Lutheran churches in Minneapolis, "in order to further clarify the erroneous and totally inaccurate nature" of a flyer being distributed that is against S. 626. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (February 19, 1976): 3811.

    • Senator Mondale discusses the need for funding community and junior colleges so they can carry out "innovative and creative new approaches to the diverse educational needs of the students/citizens in the communities they serve;" he submits a resolution by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges entitled "Doors to Educational Opportunity Must Be Kept Open." 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (May 4, 1976): 12417-12418.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article from Parade magazine entitled "Child and Family Services: The Truth About a Misunderstood Bill:" "This article does an excellent job of identifying some of the falsehoods which have been circulated about this bill, and of providing accurate information to those who wish to have the benefit of the facts." 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (June 20, 1976): 21330-21331.

    • Senator Mondale submits an article on a speech by Dr. Robert ten Bensel, a University of Minnesota professor of pediatrics, at the annual meeting of the Minnesota State Medical Association. The speech provides an historical perspective on child abuse. 94th Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 122 (July 1, 1976): 22130.

U.S. Senate hearings on children and education in which Senator Mondale participated: [Top]
  • Headstart Child Development Act: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty, pt.1, 91st Cong. (1969).

  • Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments of 1969, pt.1, 91st Cong. (1969).

  • Headstart Child Development Act: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty, pt. 2, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Emergency School Aid Act of 1970: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity. Part 1A, Introduction: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity. Part 1B, Appendix: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity. Part 1B, Appendix: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Desegregation Under Law, pt. 3A: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Desegregation Under Law, pt. 3B: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Desegregation Under Law, pt. 3C: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Desegregation Under Law, pt. 3D: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Desegregation Under Law, pt. 3E: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Mexican American Education, pt. 4: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, De facto Segregation and Housing Discrimination, pt. 5: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Racial Imbalance in Urban Schools, pt. 6: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Inequality of Economic Resources, pt. 7: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Equal Educational Opportunity: Equality of Education Opportunity, Puerto Rican Children, pt. 8: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity, 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Emergency School Aid Act of 1970: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education. 91st Cong. (1970).

  • Education Amendments of 1971: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 1, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Education Amendments of 1971: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 2, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Education Amendments of 1971: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 3, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Education Amendments of 1971: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 4, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Education Amendments of 1971: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 5, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • White House Conference on Children-Child Development Recommendations: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, pt. 1, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, pt. 2, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, pt. 3, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Child Care: Hearings Before the Committee on Finance, 92nd Cong. (1971).

  • Rights of Children, 1972: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth; Examination of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, pt. 1, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Rights of Children, 1972: Appendix-Selected Readings on Child Abuse and Day Care: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth; Examination of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, pt. 2, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Nutrition and Human Needs, 1972. Part 3A. Section 13 Funds: Summer Lunch-Pre-School Feeding: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Headstart, Child Development Legislation, 1972: Joint Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Youth Crisis Services, 1972: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Runaway Youth: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency, 92nd Cong. (1972).

  • Child Abuse Prevention Act, 1973: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Education Legislation, 1973: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 1, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Education Legislation, 1973: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 6, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Education Legislation, 1973: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, pt. 7, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, 1973: Joint Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • American Families: Trends and Pressures, 1973: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Family Contribution Schedule for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Education, 93rd Cong. (1973).

  • Education for All Handicapped Children, 1973-74: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on the Handicapped, pt. 3, 93rd Cong. (1973 and 1974).

  • Children and Youth Camp Safety Act, 1974: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong. (1974).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1974: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, 93rd Cong. (1974).

  • National Nutrition Policy Study-1974: Nutrition and Special Groups: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, pt. 3, 93rd Cong. (1974).

  • Review of Vocational Education Programs, 1975: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 1, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt.2, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 3, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 4, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 5, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 6, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 7, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 8, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child and Family Services Act, 1975: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth and the Subcommittee on Employment, Poverty, and Migratory Labor, pt. 9, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Adoption and Foster Care, 1975: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth on Examination and Exploration of Existing and Proposed Federal Policies Affecting the Adoption of Children and Their Placement in the Foster Care System, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Higher Education Legislation, 1975: Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Education: On Oversight and Information Concerning Student Assistance Under the Higher Education Act, pt.2, 94th Cong. (1975).

  • Child Care Staffing Requirements: Hearing Before the Committee on Finance, 94th Cong. (1975).

Selected Senate committee prints and reports on children and education: [Top]

    Committee Prints

  • Staff of Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 91st Cong., Allocations of Federal Funds under Three Student Assistance Programs: College Work-study Program, National Defense Student Loan Program, and Educational Opportunity Grants Program for Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970 (Comm. Print 1969).

  • Staff of Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 91st Cong., Review of Economic Opportunity Programs by the Comptroller General of the U.S. Made Pursuant to Title II of the 1967 Amendments to the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Report to the Congress of the U.S. Along with Related Agency Comments by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of the Interior (Comm. Print 1969).

  • Staff of Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 91st Cong., Comprehensive Community Child Development Act of 1971 (Comm. Print 1970).

  • Staff of Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 92nd Cong., Comprehensive Community College Act of 1971 (Comm. Print 1971).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Executive Reorganization and Government Research, 92nd Cong., Government Research on the Problems of Children and Youth (Comm. Print 1971).

  • Walter Mondale, Select Comm. on Equal Educational Opportunity, 92nd Cong., Justice for Children (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 92nd Cong., Comprehensive Headstart, Child Development, and Family Services Act of 1972. Bill Text and Section-by-Section Analysis (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty, 92nd Cong., Comprehensive Headstart, Child Development, and Family Services Act of 1972. Bill Text and Section-by-Section Analysis (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Comm. on Education and Labor and Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, 92nd Cong., Compilation of Higher Education Laws, 1972 (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Comm. on Finance, 92nd Cong., H.R. 1. Social Security Amendments of 1972. Brief Description of Senate Amendments (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Comm. on Finance, 92nd Cong., Summary of Social Security Amendments of 1972: Public Law 92-603 (H.R. 1) (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Select Comm. on Equal Educational Opportunity, 92nd Cong., Toward Equal Educational Opportunity (Comm. Print 1972).

  • Staff of Comm. on Finance, 93rd Cong., H.R. 3153, Social Security Amendments of 1973 (Comm. Print 1973).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong., Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, 1974. P.L. 93-247 (S. 1191): Questions and Answers, Analysis, and Text of the Act (Comm. Print 1974).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Children and Youth, 93rd Cong., Child and Family Services Act of 1974, S. 3754 (Comm. Print 1974).

  • Staff of Comm. on Finance, 93rd Cong., Child Care: Data and Materials (Comm. Print 1974).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Children and Youth (Paul E. Mott), 94th Cong., Foster Care and Adoptions: Some Key Policy Issues, (Comm. Print 1975).

  • Staff of Subcom. on Children and Youth, 94th Cong., Background Materials Concerning Child and Family Services Act, 1975, S. 626 (Comm. Print 1976).

  • Staff of Subcom. on the Handicapped, 94th Cong., Education of the Handicapped Act. As Amended Through Dec. 31, 1975 (Comm. Print 1976).

  • Committee Reports

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Emergency insured student loan act of 1969, S. Rep. No. 91-368 (1969).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Elementary and Secondary Education Amendments of 1969, S. Rep. No. 91-634 (1970).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Relating to Suddent Infant Death Syndrome, S. Rep. No. 92-830 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1971, S. Rep. No. 92-331 (1971).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1971, S. Rep. No. 92-346 (1971).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1971, S. Rep. No. 92-523 (1971).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-604 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-792 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Comprehensive Headstart, Child Development, and Family Services Act of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-793 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-798 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Relating to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, S. Rep. No. 92-830 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare. Senate; Committee on Education and Labor. House, Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-987 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1972, S. Rep. No. 92-1086 (1972).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education of the Handicapped Amendments of 1973, S. Rep. No. 93-238 (1973).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, S. Rep. No. 93-308 (1973).

  • Comm. on Finance, Social Security Amendments of 1973, S. Rep. No. 93-553 (1973).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1973, S. Rep. No. 93-606 (1973).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1974, S. Rep. No. 93-763 (1974).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1974, S. Rep. No. 93-1026 (1974).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Children and Youth Camp Safety Act, 1974, S. Rep. No. 93-1284 (1974).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Headstart, Economic Opportunity, and Community Partnership Act of 1974, S. Rep. No. 93-1292 (1974).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education for All Handicapped Children Act, S. Rep. No. 94-168 (1975).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1975, S. Rep. No. 94-169 (1975).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Indochina Refugee Children Assistance Act of 1975, S. Rep. No. 94-432 (1975).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education of Handicapped Children, S. Rep. No. 94-455 (1975).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Children and Youth Camp Safety Act, S. Rep. No. 94-486 (1975).

  • Comm. on Finance, Assistance in Meeting Federal Child Care Standards, S. Rep. No. 94-592 (1976).

  • Comm. on Labor and Public Welfare, Education Amendments of 1976, S. Rep. No. 94-882 (1976).

  • Congressional Research Service Reports

  • Colleen Campbell, Cong. Research Serv., ED-207, Elementary and Secondary Education Act: (Public Law 89-10, as Amended) (1967).

  • Lilla Pearce, Cong. Research Serv., ED 360, Project Head Start and Follow Through; Selected References, 1967-1968 (1969).

  • Charles A. Quattlebaum, Cong. Research Serv., Enactments by the 91st Congress Concerning Education and Training: First Session, 1969 (1970).

  • Jo Ellen Jennette, Cong. Research Serv., 72-1 ED, Comparison of Major Day Care Legislation: 92nd Congress, 1st Session (1972).

  • Colleen Campbell, Cong. Research Serv., 72-146 ED, Major Provisions of the Education Amendments of 1972: P.L. 92-318 (1972).

  • Wayne Riddle, Cong. Research Serv., 72-160 ED, Legislative History - Senate Floor Consideration of S. 659, the Education Amendments of 1972 (1972).

  • Sharon E. Enright, Cong. Research Serv., 72-176 ED, Elementary and Secondary Education Act As Amended by P.L. 92-318, the Education Amendments of 1972 (1972).

  • Stafford Smiley, Cong. Research Serv., 72-210 ED, Analysis of the Higher Education Act of 1965 as Amended, Including Amendments Made by the Education Amendments of 1972 (1972).

  • Jo Ellen Jennette, Cong. Research Serv., 72-266 ED, Child Care and Child Development: Legislative Developments During the 92nd Congress (1972).

  • Penelope S. Arnold, Cong. Research Serv., 72-225 SP, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Background Information and Congressional Interest (1972).

  • Margaret Malone, Cong. Research Serv., 74-18 ED, Child Care Proposals in the 93rd Congress, 1st Session (1974).

  • Angela Giordano-Evans, Cong. Research Serv., 74-157 ED, Headstart: Program Description and Legislative History (1974).

  • Penelope S. Arnold, Cong. Research Serv., 74-102 SP, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974 (1974).

  • Margaret Malone, Cong. Research Serv., 75-34 ED, Child Care Legislation in the 93rd Congress (1975).

  • Jean Yavis Jones, Cong. Research Serv., 75-97 ED, Child Abuse (1975).

  • Angela M. Evans, Cong. Research Serv., 75-114 ED, Program "Follow Through": History and Assessment (1975).

  • Wayne Riddle, Cong. Research Serv., 75-207 EPW, Major Provisions of the Education Amendments of 1974 - Public Law 93-380 (1975).

  • Gary F. Pastorius, Cong. Research Serv., 76-221 CR, Tax Relief to Students and Parents for Higher Education Expenses: Current Provisions and Proposed Reforms, with Selected Bibliography (1976).

  • Jean Yavis Jones, Cong. Research Serv., Child Abuse and Neglect: Legislation and Issues (1977).

  • Documents

  • Veto Message: Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1971, Message from the President, S. Doc. 92-48 (1971)


Endnotes:[TOP]
  1. Walter Mondale, "Poverty and Opportunity," in The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 91-109.
  2. Walter Mondale, The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 109.
  3. 93rd Cong., 2nd sess., Congressional Record 120 (June 4, 1974) at 17626.
  4. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (April 6, 1971) at 9869.
  5. Comprehensive Child Development Act of 1971: Joint Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower, and Poverty and the Subcommittee on Children and Youth. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., May 18 and 20, 1971. p. 637.
  6. 92nd Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 117 (December 10, 1971) at 46201.
  7. Walter Mondale, The Good Fight: A Life in Liberal Politics (New York: Scribner, 2010), 105.
  8. Ibid., 108-109.
  9. Child Abuse Prevention Act, 1973: Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Children and Youth: To Establish a National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 93rd Cong., 1st sess., March 26, 27, 31; April 24, 1973. p. 1.
  10. Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1970: Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. 91st Cong., 1st sess., December 1, 2 and 3, 1969. p. 123.
  11. 91st Cong., 1st sess., Congressional Record 115 (April 14, 1969) at 8778.